Drugs Cheat Sheet: Restrictive Airway Disorders

People with restrictive lung disease cannot fully fill their lungs with air. Their lungs are restricted from fully expanding. Restrictive lung disease most often results from a condition causing stiffness in the lungs themselves. In other cases, stiffness of the chest wall, weak muscles, or damaged nerves may cause the restriction in lung expansion.

Drugs to Treat Restrictive Airway Disorders: Medical, Surgical Nurses need to know,

Follow to the given table:

Restrictive Airway Disorders Drugs: Cheat Sheet
Bronchodilators
β2-Adrenergic Agonists
Inhaled
Albuterol (Proventil HFA, AccuNeb, ProAir HFA, Ventolin HFA)
Arformoterol (Brovana)
Formoterol (Foradil Aerolizer, Perforomist)
Levalbuterol (Xopenex, Xopenex HFA)
Pirbuterol (Maxair Autohaler)
Salmeterol (Serevent Diskus)
Oral
Albuterol (VoSpire, Proventil)
Terbutaline
Methylxanthines
Theophylline, oral (Theo-24, Theo-Dur,
Uniphyl, Elixophyllin)
Anticholinergics
Ipratropium, inhaled (Atrovent HFA; Combivent)
Tiotropium, inhaled (Spiriva)
Glucocorticoids (Corticosteroids)
Inhaled
Beclomethasone dipropionate (Qvar, Beclovent)
Budesonide (Pulmicort Turbuhaler, Pulmicort Respules, Pulmicort Flexhaler)
Ciclesonide (Alvesco)
Flunisolide (AeroBid)
Fluticasone propionate (Flovent HFA, Flovent Diskus)
Mometasone furoate (Asmanex Twisthaler)
Triamcinolone acetonide (Azmacort)
Oral
Prednisone
Prednisolone
Leukotriene
Modifiers
Montelukast, oral (Singulair)
Zafirlukast, oral (Accolate)
Zileuton, oral (Zyflo, Zyflo CR)
Inhaled Nonsteroidal Antiallergy Agent
Cromolyn sodium, inhaled
Monoclonal Antibody
Omalizumab (Xolair)

 

 

 

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